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Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/11/22 7:32 p.m.

In an effort to try & get the front brakes working better I'd ordered a new rotor & pads. They were both visibly worn & I couldn't get the front brakes to lock. 
 

When I installed the new pads, the rotor wouldn't fit between them, so I cracked open the bleed valve to try & move the pistons out. That's when I noticed the outboard one seemed to be stuck. I was finally able to free it, but now I have no front brakes, so I guess it was time to order a bleed kit & some fluid...

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/12/22 10:04 p.m.

I installed the Ergon grips today, so of course despite not having front brakes I had to take it for a spin around the hood to check them out. 
 

 

I put quite a bit of weight on the bars to try & simulate the longer climbs out on the trail, and...it's interesting. 

There's definitely less pressure & pain on the outside of my wrists like I'd been feeling, but instead the weight has now been transferred to the intersection of my thumb & forefinger. Whether that's going to be an improvement or not will take some more saddle time on the trails. I may also try rotating them slightly to see if that changes the feeling noticeably. 

adam525i
adam525i GRM+ Memberand Dork
4/13/22 12:49 p.m.

Those Shimano brakes likely have ceramic pistons which do like to crack if you aren't careful when you push them back in for a new set of pads (the key is to push them in square and not sideways in the bore) . There are aftermarket replacements available though that are aluminum with a plastic insert that should work fine, if it was a downhill bike I'd be bit more cautious of boiling the mineral oil that they use though. They're very straight forward to pull apart though so don't be intimidated if it comes to that, just some o-rings etc. in there.

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/13/22 7:19 p.m.

In reply to adam525i :

Thanks for the tips!

I got them bled today & the front will lock the wheel now, but I'm still not a fan of hydraulic brakes for bikes - at least for any riding I'd be doing. If I encounter any serious caliper or lever failure I think I'll just find some Avid mechanical disc brakes like my old bike has. They work just as well for me & are way simpler. 

I got in a little longer ride tonight, a bit over 3-miles, and the first half was with a ~13mph headwind. I'd rotated the grips slightly after I bled the brakes, and it seemed to help. 

I was leaning into the wind pretty hard for the first half, then jumped about a dozen curbs on the way back. I didn't have any pain in my left wrist & just a bit in my right one, but that's at least partly due to when I severed it back in 2000. 

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/13/22 8:25 p.m.

In reply to adam525i :

Here's a question for you: at some point I'm going to need to replace the drivetrain. The cogs are getting pretty worn & there's grit inside the chain. What are your thoughts on 1x setups?

I like the idea of not having to think about which chainring I'm on relative to what gear I'm in, but the gearing now works really well, so I don't want to make things worse for myself. 

adam525i
adam525i GRM+ Memberand Dork
4/13/22 10:51 p.m.

In reply to Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) :

Now that you have the brakes working they should be maintenance free until it is time for pads again, maybe a simple lever bleed if the pull gets too long.

I really like 1x for single track riding and have both 1 x 11 (11-46 cassette) and 1 x 12 bikes (10-52? cassette), it's simple and the gear spacing works well on the trails where the bigger gaps aren't a problem. Pay attention to the gears that you are actually using to see what sort of range works for you and go from there. If you are doing some multi-use trail riding maybe the larger range with tighter gear spacing works out better keeping you spinning where you want to be.

As far as keeping your current drivetrain going keeping things clean is important but also changing out the chain as it wears. I have a simple Park Tools chain stretch tool that tells me when it gets too long and it is time to replace, a new chain will run quieter and keep the wear on the cassette and chainrings to a minimum. I wouldn't be too quick to toss your old drivetrain, especially if the gearing is working for you. It adds up pretty quick moving over to a 1x drivetrain.

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/14/22 9:43 a.m.

In reply to adam525i :

Thanks that's good to know. One other issue is I really need a bash ring, but I do use the big chainring so I'm hesitant to just pull it off & replace it with a bash ring - though it already has a couple mangled teeth from the PO, so that's another reason why I'm looking towards replacing everything at some point in the future. 

If I do switch to a 1x will I likely need a new BB too? Or is that pretty much standard between cranksets?

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/14/22 11:16 a.m.

I've got Ergon grips on both of my mountain bikes. I like them. You do have to tweak the rotation to get it right for sure.

I know everyone loves the 1x drivetrains these days, but I really like the ability to have a high range and low range. My fast hardtail bike is a 1x and it works for that bike, but it's definitely missing a couple of gears on the low end. My full suspension is 3x9 and it's a lot more flexible gearing-wise. It can handle a wider range of riding conditions. 1x is easier to set up and cheaper to make though.

mfennell
mfennell Reader
4/14/22 11:28 a.m.

To reinforce adam's point, if you're good about replacing chains, the rest of the drivetrain can last a very, very long time.  It's not a perfect comparison but my basement road bike now has at least 35,0000 miles on the chainrings and two different cassettes (neither wore out, I just had two I swapped between).  My current road bike has 10,500 on the gears.  On MTBs, with regular chain swaps using the tool adam linked to, I've only ever worn out one chainring.  Ignoring chains, I've ruined everything at once, which can be expensive.

adam525i
adam525i GRM+ Memberand Dork
4/14/22 3:46 p.m.
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to adam525i :

If I do switch to a 1x will I likely need a new BB too? Or is that pretty much standard between cranksets?

There's actually a pretty good chance you can just pick up a narrow-wide single ring that mounts where your middle ring currently lives on your crankset and re-use it all. You'll have to figure out what your crankset BCD  is (bolt center distance, likely 96 mm) so you can get the right chainring. If you want you can then mount a bashring on to replace your big ring and just pull off the granny gear (the little one). 

Having said that, I'd still run your current drivetrain until it needs something major replaced like the derailuer after sending a stick through it or smashing it off a rock and you are forced to spend money. If you want to spend some money now maybe some fancy tires better suited to your trails would be a good way to go.

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/14/22 9:27 p.m.

Thanks everyone! I was just looking at how u-shaped my cogs were getting & thinking their days were numbered. 

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/15/22 8:32 p.m.

I put about 7 miles on the bike today. It was just along the beach, so nothing too bumpy or extreme(other than hopping a few curbs, one set of stairs & a ~2' drop), although there was a pretty strong headwind on the way there. My wrists didn't bother me at all, so I'm glad I got the Ergons. 

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
4/15/22 10:12 p.m.

Great deal!  I agree a 1x set up is great.  All three of my mtn bikes are 12 spd, but for the most part 11 spd is fine.  I ran 1x10 for quite a while and didn't mind that much. 

One modern part I couldn't live without now would be a dropper seat post.  However, I'm not sure a 2012 frame would have been designed for internal routing.  

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/26/22 7:53 p.m.

I was riding past the bike shop last week when one of the guys stopped me. They'd found a pair of bars that fell behind a shelf with more sweep like I was looking for. So I went back today & picked them up. 
 

I didn't really notice a difference with my wrists on the new bars. My hands still get a bit numb after I've really been pedaling hard, but I'll need to hit the trails sometime to really test them out. 
 

Oapfu
Oapfu GRM+ Memberand New Reader
4/27/22 9:12 p.m.
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

One modern part I couldn't live without now would be a dropper seat post.  However, I'm not sure a 2012 frame would have been designed for internal routing.  

If you do need an external-routed post, PNW has some which maybe do not suck.  At least the reviews etc. sounded good enough that I got one... but I have not done anything with it yet.  Yay for half of a data point?

PNW also has factory refurbs for a few $ less: https://cycled.pnwcomponents.com/collections/externally-routed-dropper-posts

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/28/22 3:36 p.m.

In reply to Oapfu :

Thanks!

I've not encountered a need for a dropper yet, but I did notice there's a rubber plug on the front of the seat tube, down near the BB. Would that be for routing a dropper cable?

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