1 2 3
camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 12:02 p.m.

In reply to iansane :

They said no.

1988RedT2
1988RedT2 MegaDork
6/13/24 12:10 p.m.
TJL (Forum Supporter) said:

Does he still have his balls?

I'm a little surprised this comment hasn't gotten some reactions, because it's very relevant.  I grew up with a un-neutered male dog--a 110 lb. German Shepherd/Siberian Husky mix--and I have the scars to prove it.  Decades later, when it came time for a dog to be added to our family I insisted on a female, and she's been the sweetest, most obedient dog I've ever known. 

The OP has a ticking time bomb on his hands.  I urge him to take the difficult step and fix the problem.

Floating Doc (Forum Supporter)
Floating Doc (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand UltimaDork
6/13/24 12:15 p.m.
camopaint0707 said:

In reply to Floating Doc (Forum Supporter) :

Vet offered to put him down free of charge....if that says anything.

That's enough for me to trust their judgment. Call the vet before you have to call 911 for your child or yourself.

pheller
pheller UltimaDork
6/13/24 12:23 p.m.

An Australian Shephard is a weird dog to have these types of personality traits. Most are sweet dogs, but males are commonly reactive. Most people distract them from triggers.

They need to be run. A lot. Sheepdogs were bred for that anxiety induced need to be alert and constantly moving. 

Take some cute pictures, join a facebook group and see if anyone wants a challenge dog. 

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 12:31 p.m.

In reply to pheller :

Our guess is the dog didn't have a good life before he showed up at our door basically.

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 12:31 p.m.

In reply to 1988RedT2 :

The dog is fixed.

Stampie
Stampie GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
6/13/24 12:44 p.m.

In reply to camopaint0707 :

First let me say I'm sorry that you're in the situation.  A dog like that is a difficult task.  I've had Bob 8 months now and it's a constant battle of him testing to see who's in control.  If you are scared of the dog you'll never regain that control.  I agree with above that it's best to call the vet.  If you choose to not do so then take the advice above and wear it out with exercise.  Excerpt control (not dominance ... let we said in the military respect is earned not awarded) so that the dog starts to know that you are in charge.  I make Bob sit/stay every time we go to walk out the door.  One it settles him down but mainly it let's him know that I'm in charge.  He may resist but I don't let him win by giving up.  It's slowly getting easier but you can't let up.  How often do you guys walk?  

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 12:45 p.m.

In reply to Stampie :

we simply don't have the time to exercise him to the level he needs

cyow5
cyow5 Reader
6/13/24 12:49 p.m.
camopaint0707 said:

In reply to Stampie :

we simply don't have the time to exercise him to the level he needs

If you have the space, have you tried giving him a large (like 3'+ diameter) ball to chase? Corgis are also a herding breed, and my male corgi will chase those stupid balls until we take it from him. It is minimal commitment for us, and he burns through a ton of energy quickly. His sister isn't the least bit interested in the ball, but she'll chase her brother like crazy while we go do whatever like push the kids in the swing. 

 

Edit to add: this is if you want another option. To be clear, I would hold absolutely nothing against you for doing the hard thing either. 

golfduke
golfduke Dork
6/13/24 12:51 p.m.

I'm sorry if this was mentioned before, but where (geographically) are you located approximately?  I work with a sanctuary org that does nothing but take in problem animals destined for euthanasia, but you'd have to be in NH, or close thereabouts.

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 12:57 p.m.

In reply to golfduke :

pennsylvania-find me one locally I haven't called

golfduke
golfduke Dork
6/13/24 1:02 p.m.
camopaint0707 said:

In reply to golfduke :

pennsylvania-find me one locally I haven't called

Oh I definitely believe you.  I was just trying to help is all.  I wish you nothing but solace and comfort for this really difficult situation...

TRoglodyte
TRoglodyte UltraDork
6/13/24 1:13 p.m.
Floating Doc (Forum Supporter) said:
camopaint0707 said:

In reply to Floating Doc (Forum Supporter) :

Vet offered to put him down free of charge....if that says anything.

That's enough for me to trust their judgment. Call the vet before you have to call 911 for your child or yourself.

OP: you have the advice of 2 different animal care professionals and several animal lovers here that euthanasia is the most prudent, humane solution. Do it with a clear conscience and move on.

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 1:14 p.m.

In reply to TRoglodyte :

clear conscience.....I'll work on that.  

wae
wae UltimaDork
6/13/24 1:26 p.m.

I'm a dog-lover and tend to lean towards "there's no such thing as a bad dog" and "who would throw away a perfectly good dog!?" et cetera.  But in this case, it sounds like you've got yourself a very difficult animal that was likely damaged beyond reasonable repair before he landed on your doorstep.  The dog is certainly not living his best life, probably doesn't understand why he's so miserable all the time, and there really isn't anything that you can do about it.  You could cage him more or less permanently so that he doesn't do any harm to your family or any passer-by, but that would simply keep him from causing physical injury to others - he'd still be miserable.  You've looked around to see if someone with the appropriate skillset can take the dog to try to rehabilitate him, but there isn't anyone available.  You've gotten a professional medical opinion that euthanizing the animal is a proper course of action.

This doesn't make you a bad person.  Someone with a deficient soul or a lack of humanity wouldn't agonize over this decision.  You're not putting the dog down because it is inconvenient for you or because you're simply angry at it.  Be sad that it's come to this point with the dog and be sad because you feel like you couldn't give the animal what it needs because that's the human thing to do.  But at the same time, know that euthanizing the dog before he causes more harm is the humane thing to do.

Apis Mellifera
Apis Mellifera Dork
6/13/24 1:26 p.m.

My undergrad is in vet. science and though I didn't go on to vet. school, I do recall guidance  from more than one professor when it comes to dangerous animals.  For small animals (pets), it matches the advice your vet. gave you.  I am, however, 100% qualified to give Dad and farmer advice - that dog would not be anywhere near my wife and children and after getting bit, the dog would have gotten a full dose of .22LR.  Way too much of a liability on many fronts to consider anything else.

thedoc
thedoc GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
6/13/24 1:48 p.m.

I know a very reputable dog trainer.  I was talking with her after my niece was bit in the face by a dog.  Her comment:  Not every dog can or should  be saved.  It has been all been said on this forum, and I'm sorry for you.  I am going to feel worse for you and the person this dog bites.  Life is too short and too hard to continue with this.  Putting the dog down is the best solution.  Sorry.

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 2:01 p.m.

In reply to thedoc :

fml

pheller
pheller UltimaDork
6/13/24 2:21 p.m.

I think it's hard to make that decision about an animal unless you've spent quality time with them. A dog that bites a stranger is a risk because strangers can't spend quality time with a dog, and every stranger then becomes a threat. 

But an animal that's around its family frequently and perhaps bites someone out of fear is different. It sounds like this dog has lashed under certain situations, but is typically mild mannered. I still wouldn't want it in my house, but I'd try all options before putting it down. 

I think you post on Facebook marketplace, far and wide, that you've got a dog with a history and see if anyone wants a challenge. Ask anyone who's interested if you can drop off the dog at their house directly so you can see what the living situation is like. 

If I didn't have kids, didn't work, and had lots of time to dedicate to an animal, a reactive Aussie wouldn't bother me much. 

StilettoSS
StilettoSS Reader
6/13/24 2:22 p.m.

I'm an animal lover 100%. That said, I agree with putting this particular dog down. I went through this as a child about 10. My family had a dog (scary 150lb breed won't be mentioned for fairness) and the neighborhood kids drove it insane. Throwing rocks, barking at him constantly, etc. He grew more and more dangerous over time, despite everything we tried (everything). It came down to him living outside with a doghouse permanently, and I was the only one that could go near him. One day he bit my hand (stitches) when I went to feed him and that was the last straw. He was beyond rehabilitation and was a serious threat. He was too dangerous to try to transport, so our small town sheriff came and shot him in the yard. It was terrible for everyone involved, and I felt terrible despite what he did to me, but it was the right thing to do and even at 10 I understood that. Doesn't mean I didn't cry...

Also, little E36 M3head kids that torment animals should have rocks thrown at them, or at least a spanking...

 

I'm sorry you are going through this, keep strong.

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 2:29 p.m.

In reply to StilettoSS :

well that story just didn't help at all....christ

budget_bandit
budget_bandit Reader
6/13/24 2:40 p.m.

So what are you looking for? You've gotten the advice you came for now you need to take action.

You're not a bad person if you put this dog down. You will be a bad person if you don't put it down and it hurts someone. Don't let that happen to your kids.

camopaint0707
camopaint0707 HalfDork
6/13/24 2:44 p.m.

In reply to budget_bandit :

I don't even know man.  Ngl, I'm a little distraught.  

Geoffrey
Geoffrey New Reader
6/13/24 2:44 p.m.

My late wife and I fostered 55 dogs and puppies.

Only one dog, a male was a problem.  When I returned him to the shelter, I make a point of his unstable nature..  Euthanasia was the end result.

Your conscience should be clear.

Euthanasia is the proper course and overdue.  Please, do it today!

John Welsh
John Welsh Mod Squad
6/13/24 2:58 p.m.
camopaint0707 said:

In reply to TRoglodyte :

clear conscience.....I'll work on that.  

Its not that no one cared for Old Yeller but Old Yeller wasn't "right" any more...and he wasn't gonna get right either.  
Sad for sure but its a story older than the 1957 movie release.  

1 2 3

You'll need to log in to post.

Our Preferred Partners
6Ejw27kBqA4tib6ooa9peNQt9fZfFcldt6xRNEVG9qTcCkEnyxPfFXSRplu4k5GA