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daeman
daeman HalfDork
5/12/16 11:01 p.m.
SVreX wrote: If durability is your primary issue, forget IKEA. They make pretty stuff, not durable. The issue is not the material, it's the joinery. Their faces are fine. I don't mind IKEA- I used them in my own house. I would never use them in a property I intended to rent. For a rental house, either they need to be built like a Mac truck, or cheap enough to be disposable. IKEA is neither of those.

What prompted you to use IKEA? A guy whith your experience would have any number of industry contacts. What made you choose IKEA?

It's one of several options I've been looking at and just wondering what made you choose it above other options?

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
5/13/16 5:25 a.m.

In reply to Enyar:

Now bearing in mind we didn't buy or install the cabinets in my house - so it's possible the PO bought the cheapest cabinets available and the installer was a novice. However, after about 20 years, they were essentially done. Now they are visibly in need of replacement before I can realistically consider the resale value of the house. Drawer fronts broken off, multiple trim pieces that won't stay on, cabinet doors that don't close evenly (a couple never really did). I am not a person who is hard on things and it's not like there are a ton of people abusing the kitchen (I have lived essentially alone in the house since 1994). For better or worse, there are a number of other parts of the house in worse condition so the kitchen is last on the renovation list, but it definitely has to get done.

OHSCrifle
OHSCrifle GRM+ Memberand Dork
5/13/16 5:48 a.m.

If you don't care for the ugly IKEA "Shaker" door stye and drawer fronts but like the drawer and hardware.. What about IKEA boxes with custom doors and drawer fronts (from Barker's or another shop)?

My suggestion is to buy some ready to assemble (RTA) boxes made from MDF for all except the sink cabinet. Use a plywood box for the sink base. Glue all the joints when assembling.

If you are worried about leaks, use plywood for anything near a water source. I had a cabinet next to a dishwasher disintegrate due to water damage.

Enyar
Enyar Dork
5/13/16 8:18 a.m.
Mezzanine wrote: Regarding your layout, it sounds like you'll be sticking pretty close to the current layout, which will definitely be the cheapest, fastest, and easiest option. Layout looks fine - snug, but that is really a function of the space you have to work with. The area between the stove and the sink is where ALL of your prep and work will be done, so consider your lighting for that area carefully. Assuming you aren't really changing the layout, I'd second some of the earlier advice regarding getting new doors made up for the boxes you already have - read T25torx's thread where he did just this with spectacular results. Mid-way or most of the way through THIS page. To really get the cost down, reusing some or all of your existing cabinets and just get new doors (and hardware?).

The layout is changing a little. We're going from a double 30" sink to a single 24" sink. The fridge and the oven are swapping sides and we are adding that little island. We're also adding that pantry to the right of the fridge, removing the soffit and running the cabinets up to the ceiling. Once I pick out the cabinets I'll start a build thread. Reusing the current boxes arent an option as they are 36 years old, particle board and starting to fall apart.Plus we have two different types of cabinets in there now.

Ian F wrote: In reply to Enyar: Now bearing in mind we didn't buy or install the cabinets in my house - so it's possible the PO bought the cheapest cabinets available and the installer was a novice. However, after about 20 years, they were essentially done. Now they are visibly in need of replacement before I can realistically consider the resale value of the house. Drawer fronts broken off, multiple trim pieces that won't stay on, cabinet doors that don't close evenly (a couple never really did). I am not a person who is hard on things and it's not like there are a ton of people abusing the kitchen (I have lived essentially alone in the house since 1994). For better or worse, there are a number of other parts of the house in worse condition so the kitchen is last on the renovation list, but it definitely has to get done.

That's unfortunate to hear but you also have to realize Ikea cabinets are 1/2 the cost of other cabinets. Figure by the time they are 20 years old they are out of style anyway and you can buy another set to last another 20 years for the same price as you paid for your out of style wood cabinets. I hate this disposable society we are in but it's tough to argue those numbers.

OHSCrifle wrote: If you don't care for the ugly IKEA "Shaker" door stye and drawer fronts but like the drawer and hardware.. What about IKEA boxes with custom doors and drawer fronts (from Barker's or another shop)? My suggestion is to buy some ready to assemble (RTA) boxes made from MDF for all except the sink cabinet. Use a plywood box for the sink base. Glue all the joints when assembling. If you are worried about leaks, use plywood for anything near a water source. I had a cabinet next to a dishwasher disintegrate due to water damage.

The custom doors are EXPENSIVE! I looked into Scherrs and Semi hand made. Semihandmade is a small fortune and not a valid option unless you buy the DIY ones they offer. Scherrs is more reasonable and still an option. You can get the doors for 15-20% premium over Ikea and either DIY paint or have them paint it ($$$$). Still deciding if it's worth the 15-20% premium and the additional delivery fee to go from Birch to Paint Grade Maple. I am leaning towards sticking with the IKEA birch like that if I need a replacement door it's cheap and easily accessible.

Another thing I will add is our home isn't too fancy. Property values are around 180-220k which is mid/lower tier around here.If we had a nicer house I think I would go with those Barker cabinets mentioned above. Those look real slick. I am still considering them because they would be indestructible in a rental property.

Enyar
Enyar Dork
5/13/16 8:20 a.m.
Ian F wrote: In reply to Enyar: Now bearing in mind we didn't buy or install the cabinets in my house - so it's possible the PO bought the cheapest cabinets available and the installer was a novice. However, after about 20 years, they were essentially done. Now they are visibly in need of replacement before I can realistically consider the resale value of the house. Drawer fronts broken off, multiple trim pieces that won't stay on, cabinet doors that don't close evenly (a couple never really did). I am not a person who is hard on things and it's not like there are a ton of people abusing the kitchen (I have lived essentially alone in the house since 1994). For better or worse, there are a number of other parts of the house in worse condition so the kitchen is last on the renovation list, but it definitely has to get done.

Another thing is if they are IKEA, it doesn't matter if they went with the cheapest or most expensinve option. The boxes and hinges are the same in their cheapest line and more expensive line. The only difference are the cabinet fronts.

tr8todd
tr8todd Dork
5/13/16 9:05 a.m.

I've done 2 kitchens in the last year where the homeowners bought Ikea cabinets and sinks. Garbage! The first one had blue painted cabinets. Even the slightest brush up against it would leave a mark. I had to screw the dishwasher anti tip straps into the cabinets sides. The wood split and the screws would not hold. The second one had grey painted cabinets. The carpenters didn't realize they came in boxes and had to be assembled. Man were they pissed by the time they finished installing them. First time they fired up the gas stove, the grey paint on an upper cabinet started to blister. One of the guys said the cabinets were metric measurements as well and that threw off all the rough ins, but I can't confirm that. I had to go back and move the gas line because it came up right at the edge of the adjacent cabinet instead of a couple of inches away. The basket strainers they sent with the sink were the cheapest things I have ever seen, and the reach on the threaded part wasn't even long enough to get the securing nut started. Not that it would have held, seeing how they were plastic.

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
5/13/16 10:07 a.m.
Enyar wrote: Another thing I will add is our home isn't too fancy. Property values are around 180-220k which is mid/lower tier around here.If we had a nicer house I think I would go with those Barker cabinets mentioned above. Those look real slick. I am still considering them because they would be indestructible in a rental property.

I hear you on the investment/value front. My house might be worth $180K in perfect condition and for the right buyer, but the $150K range is more likely. That said, if my backyard shop plans work out, I have no intention of ever moving out of the house until I croak (or I win the lottery or something). So my plan would be these would be the last kitchen cabinets I ever install and I'd rather pay 2x as much now when I have the money vs. doing it again in ~20 years when I'm hoping to retire.

Enyar
Enyar Dork
5/13/16 11:09 a.m.

Hmmmm it's tough to hear the bad experiences you guys have but then have pros lie Svrex and Keith use them in their own homes. My parents/sister both installed Ikea in their homes and I'm visiting this weekend. I plan on spending a LOT of time inspecting the ins and outs.

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
5/13/16 12:22 p.m.

I'm a pro Miata guy, I am NOT a pro builder. This is important.

BTW, my cabinets all have solid wood fronts and not foil. I can't comment on how the latter last.

iamrobb23
iamrobb23 New Spammer
1/4/20 12:21 a.m.

I still prefer and suggest cabinets. I think other home owners saying good bye to old dingy cabinets and hello to your new [white cedar canoes]! The silky-smooth white finish on these [canoes] is best-in-class. Guaranteed. This means lasting cabinetry beauty for years to come.

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/4/20 12:51 p.m.

I do love me some cedar canoes.

But FYI - since the last time this thread was around, I've built another kitchen with IKEA cabinets. This is the current generation, not the previous one I used last time. Improvements to the lighting are good, but the interior colors have changed  and the solid wood faces now have some sort of veneer on them that doesn't strike me as being quite as durable as the last. They're going to last about as well as the  high-end custom 1982 cabinets I pulled out, though, and they have much better hardware. So that's 7 years of living with an IKEA kitchen and building two fairly large ones. I'd do it again.

BTW, they are not metric sizes in the US. They are exact inch measurements.

John Welsh
John Welsh Mod Squad
11/14/21 3:14 a.m.

old thread from 2016 brought back by spammer.

Move along,, nothing new to see here.

Toyman01 + Sized and
Toyman01 + Sized and GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
11/14/21 7:24 a.m.

This thread is relevant to my current interest. 

Anyone want to update their original posts?

Our current cabinets are mdf with a plastic veneer. The veneer is separating and cracking. 

The boxes are still in good shape so I'm considering a facelift with doors and drawer fronts. 

Any thoughts or input would be appreciated.

Wayslow
Wayslow Dork
11/15/21 8:51 a.m.

I know this is a zombie thread but I want to add our experience with IKEA cabinets. 

 We renovated our kitchen about 10 years ago and opted to go the IKEA route. The boxes and hardware have proven to be durable but the doors all discoloured over the years. IKEA has a 25 year warranty on their kitchens but the back box design has changed since we bought our cabinets. This means that the current door and drawer fronts won't fit. IKEA paid for new custom made panels to replace our drawer fronts, doors and the back of our island. The work was done by a small family owned local cabinet shop. The total cost was about three times the original purchase. IKEA sent us a cheque for the full amount. Can't beat that for standing behind their product. 

dculberson
dculberson MegaDork
11/15/21 8:58 a.m.

In reply to Wayslow :

WOW that is impressive!!

93gsxturbo
93gsxturbo UltraDork
11/15/21 12:50 p.m.

Thats pretty impressive from Ikea.

My wife and I were going to use them for our basement bar renovations, had it all laid out, went to buy the pieces and they said "out of stock, no way of knowing when they will be in stock, no way of putting in a backorder"

So we went down the street to Menards, ordered everything, had it in a week, installed it ourself in 3 days.  Really really happy with the Menards stuff.  It went right together and looks great.  

Teh E36 M3
Teh E36 M3 UltraDork
11/15/21 5:01 p.m.

I've done two Ikea kitchens. The design software is a bit of a pain depending on your OS, but in the end, it's fantastic. You don't have to piece together all the bits and pieces, the cabinets (although MDF) are good quality, easy to assemble, and there are infinite accessories to make storage better. You can also change out doors/covers and keep the boxes if you tire of the style. 25 year warranty. All euro hardware, and name brand as well (Blum). I think around this time of year they have a 15% off sale as well. 

My experience only.

SVreX (Forum Supporter)
SVreX (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
11/15/21 5:29 p.m.

In reply to Teh E36 M3 :

That's good info. 
 

Although I've been in construction for 45 years and done hundreds of kitchens, I've never done an IKEA kitchen. 
 

I may try one soon. 

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
11/15/21 5:40 p.m.

I was actually in Ikea talking to them about my kitchen this weekend. They're discontinuing the finish that's on my doors (etc) but it's still under the 25 year warranty. Apparently they do keep a stash of replacement parts somewhere and if that's depleted, they'll do what has to be done. Wayslow, that's great news that it's not just talk.

FYI, when I'm building mine I always put a shot of white glue wherever there's a joint including where there are wooden dowels. Haven't had a reason to doubt the strength of the mechanical fasteners, but it sure doesn't hurt.

Ikea is having some real supply problems right now, though, so I would not be surprised to hear that a full kitchen would be hard to assemble at the moment.

Note: we picked up our first kitchen from the store in Denver. For the second, we had it shipped to us by truck. Bad idea - loads of delays, very poor loading of the pallet, damaged parts, etc. It's well worth picking it up yourself. You do have 24 or 48 hours to inventory and report any missing parts, they ship replacements out by courier.

Enyar
Enyar SuperDork
2/24/22 8:57 p.m.

Since yall asked and I'm going through all my old threads.....they've been great! Love them and will 100% use them in all future homes. Billion times better than the cheap stuff from home Depot and Lowes and not really much more. My friend just put semi custom cabinets in his $1m home and we both agree that the Ikea system is smarter and better. Last thread I updated was about the ceiling which happens to have cabinets in it so here ya go!

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